Ahola Special starts its biggest wind farm job to date

Ahola Special starts its biggest wind farm job to date

Photo: Ahola Special

Finnish project logistics and heavy transport specialist, Ahola Special, part of the Ahola Group, have secured its biggest wind project to date transporting 56 of the Pjelax wind turbines from the port of Kaskinen to the project site. 

The shipments of the wind turbine components have started mid-January, according to the port itself. Ahola Special said it will be transporting the components of a total of 56 wind turbines from the port to the construction site in Pjelax. This will require approximately 700 individual special transports.

Historic first wind turbine components delivery to Port of Kaskinen
Photo:

The project is being developed by Fortum and Helen in Närpiö and Kristiinankaupunki. According to the target schedule, the Pjelax wind farm will be commissioned by the summer of 2024. When completed, it will annually produce approximately 1.1 TWh of renewable energy.

A massive task for Ahola

The wind blades for the Pjelax project are each 80 metres long and weigh some 27 tons. Wind turbine towers will be delivered in seven sections each 12-30 metres in length, depending on the unit.

“We are happy that the construction of the wind farm has progressed smoothly and that the turbine supplier Nordex will be able to install the first wind turbines during the spring. All parts of the wind turbines come by ship to the port of Kaskisten, from where they are transported by road to the construction site. The transport route is about 15 kilometres long. The short distance enables environmentally friendly and smooth transportation,” says project manager Markus Rönnqvist.

Ahola’s Rönnqvist further noted that transport will continue throughout the spring and until autumn, with components transported one at a time due to technical nature of the transport.

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Author: Adnan Bajic

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Ahola Special starts its biggest wind farm job to date | Project Cargo Journal
Ahola Special starts its biggest wind farm job to date

Ahola Special starts its biggest wind farm job to date

Photo: Ahola Special

Finnish project logistics and heavy transport specialist, Ahola Special, part of the Ahola Group, have secured its biggest wind project to date transporting 56 of the Pjelax wind turbines from the port of Kaskinen to the project site. 

The shipments of the wind turbine components have started mid-January, according to the port itself. Ahola Special said it will be transporting the components of a total of 56 wind turbines from the port to the construction site in Pjelax. This will require approximately 700 individual special transports.

Historic first wind turbine components delivery to Port of Kaskinen
Photo:

The project is being developed by Fortum and Helen in Närpiö and Kristiinankaupunki. According to the target schedule, the Pjelax wind farm will be commissioned by the summer of 2024. When completed, it will annually produce approximately 1.1 TWh of renewable energy.

A massive task for Ahola

The wind blades for the Pjelax project are each 80 metres long and weigh some 27 tons. Wind turbine towers will be delivered in seven sections each 12-30 metres in length, depending on the unit.

“We are happy that the construction of the wind farm has progressed smoothly and that the turbine supplier Nordex will be able to install the first wind turbines during the spring. All parts of the wind turbines come by ship to the port of Kaskisten, from where they are transported by road to the construction site. The transport route is about 15 kilometres long. The short distance enables environmentally friendly and smooth transportation,” says project manager Markus Rönnqvist.

Ahola’s Rönnqvist further noted that transport will continue throughout the spring and until autumn, with components transported one at a time due to technical nature of the transport.

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Author: Adnan Bajic

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