Heat exchangers travel a short but complex route

Heat exchangers travel a short but complex route

Photo:Allelys

Two heat exchangers posed a complex challenge but also brought more work to one of the UK’s abnormal load specialists, Allelys. The company was tagged to contribute to a heat exchanger project in Teeside, by delivering a series of vessels from Teesport to Lazenby. 

The original scope of work for Allelys was to receive and deliver two large vessels of 30 and 12 metres, with a weight of 130 te and 29 te, respectively. However, the scope soon increased when Allelys was contracted to deliver additional loads to the project site. The additional loads consisted of five smaller vessels weighing up to 4.5 te, as well as two ancillary boxes.

Short and sweet, or complex?

Although the route was reasonably short in distance, the specific requirements necessary to deliver the cargo made the job a complex one. The specifics of the loads meant that the cargo had to go through the British Steel and Teeswork sites, which further added complexities as the cargo would have to be transported over four sets of rail tracks.

Allelys planned the operation to deliver the loads in convoy, to minimise disruption and accelerate the delivery time, utilising a seven-bed six-axle trailer for the 130 te vessel, a three-axle wafer deck for the 29 te vessel and a flatbed trailer for the smaller vessels and ancillary boxes.

Allelys provided and laid steel plates around each of the rail tracks to support the loads and gain access to the delivery area. Once the deliveries reached their destination, the two larger pieces were offloaded using the trailers’ hydraulics and the smaller loads were offloaded using Allelys’ HIAB.

“The project showcases how Allelys treat each and every project with the same diligence. Although the route itself was short, understanding and overcoming the complexities around it were vital for the loads to be delivered successfully”, commented Simon Davies, Project Manager at Allelys.

Author: Adnan Bajic

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Heat exchangers travel a short but complex route | Project Cargo Journal
Heat exchangers travel a short but complex route

Heat exchangers travel a short but complex route

Photo: Allelys

Two heat exchangers posed a complex challenge but also brought more work to one of the UK’s abnormal load specialists, Allelys. The company was tagged to contribute to a heat exchanger project in Teeside, by delivering a series of vessels from Teesport to Lazenby. 

The original scope of work for Allelys was to receive and deliver two large vessels of 30 and 12 metres, with a weight of 130 te and 29 te, respectively. However, the scope soon increased when Allelys was contracted to deliver additional loads to the project site. The additional loads consisted of five smaller vessels weighing up to 4.5 te, as well as two ancillary boxes.

Short and sweet, or complex?

Although the route was reasonably short in distance, the specific requirements necessary to deliver the cargo made the job a complex one. The specifics of the loads meant that the cargo had to go through the British Steel and Teeswork sites, which further added complexities as the cargo would have to be transported over four sets of rail tracks.

Allelys planned the operation to deliver the loads in convoy, to minimise disruption and accelerate the delivery time, utilising a seven-bed six-axle trailer for the 130 te vessel, a three-axle wafer deck for the 29 te vessel and a flatbed trailer for the smaller vessels and ancillary boxes.

Allelys provided and laid steel plates around each of the rail tracks to support the loads and gain access to the delivery area. Once the deliveries reached their destination, the two larger pieces were offloaded using the trailers’ hydraulics and the smaller loads were offloaded using Allelys’ HIAB.

“The project showcases how Allelys treat each and every project with the same diligence. Although the route itself was short, understanding and overcoming the complexities around it were vital for the loads to be delivered successfully”, commented Simon Davies, Project Manager at Allelys.

Author: Adnan Bajic

Add your comment

characters remaining.

Log in through one of the following social media partners to comment.