Osprey to load out world’s largest tidal turbine

Osprey has been contracted to load out the world’s most powerful tidal turbine, which will be installed in the spring of 2021 at the European Marine Energy Centre in Orkney, UK. The Orbital O2 tidal turbine will be able to deliver 2MW of clean energy. 

Moored via anchors in powerful tidal streams or river currents, Orbital’s tidal turbine’s underwater rotors capture the dense and predictable renewable energy that flows in the world’s ocean and river currents.

The Orbital O2 turbine is being assembled in Dundee. A line-configuration of SPMT’s will be used to move the equipment from its construction site to a launch site, where it will be loaded onto a barge. The barge will then be taken to the float-offsite and submerged to a depth of seven metres, from which point the O2 will be floated off and tugged out into position.

“The innovation behind our logistics lets us develop new methods of logistics’ deployment and it enables us to transfer those techniques from one sector to the next”, says CEO Nigel Fletcher of Osprey.

Author: Tobias Pieffers

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Osprey to load out world’s largest tidal turbine | Project Cargo Journal

Osprey to load out world’s largest tidal turbine

Osprey has been contracted to load out the world’s most powerful tidal turbine, which will be installed in the spring of 2021 at the European Marine Energy Centre in Orkney, UK. The Orbital O2 tidal turbine will be able to deliver 2MW of clean energy. 

Moored via anchors in powerful tidal streams or river currents, Orbital’s tidal turbine’s underwater rotors capture the dense and predictable renewable energy that flows in the world’s ocean and river currents.

The Orbital O2 turbine is being assembled in Dundee. A line-configuration of SPMT’s will be used to move the equipment from its construction site to a launch site, where it will be loaded onto a barge. The barge will then be taken to the float-offsite and submerged to a depth of seven metres, from which point the O2 will be floated off and tugged out into position.

“The innovation behind our logistics lets us develop new methods of logistics’ deployment and it enables us to transfer those techniques from one sector to the next”, says CEO Nigel Fletcher of Osprey.

Author: Tobias Pieffers

Add your comment

characters remaining.

Log in through one of the following social media partners to comment.