9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund

9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund

Photo: BigLift Shipping

Almost a year on after delivering the 6780.5-ton Dogger Bank A HVDC converter station, BigLift Shipping’s DP2 heavy transport vessel BigLift Baffin has delivered the 9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station to Haugesund. Specifically, the module has been delivered to Aibel’s yard where further outfitting will take place. 

Aibel has only recently completed the outfitting of the Dogger Bank A converter station and set it on its foundations at the field. Soon it will be ready to receive power from 95 wind turbines.

Only a few days ago, BigLift Shipping noted that BigLift Baffin is sailing in the Dutch waters, however, the vessel’s AIS position shows it has already reached Aibel’s yard in Haugesund, Norway. Aibel also confirmed the arrival through its social media channels, noting it is the second of three converter platforms that Aibel will deliver to the Dogger Bank wind farm.

9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund
Photo: Øyvind Sætre / Aibel

Dogger Bank Offshore Wind

Dogger Bank Wind Farm, a joint venture between SSE Renewables, Equinor, and Vårgrønn, is set to be the world’s largest offshore wind farm consisting of 277 wind turbines. The wind farm will be capable of of generating 3.6GW of renewable energy which is enough clean and sustainable electricity to power more than 6 million homes.

Dogger Bank A and B, with a combined generation capacity of 2.4GW, will connect in to the existing Creyke Beck substation near Cottingham in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The subsea export cables will make landfall to the north of Ulrome, where around 30km of underground cables will take the electricity to converter stations near to Cottingham before passing through the adjacent Creyke Beck substation on to the National Grid.

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Author: Adnan Bajic

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9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund | Project Cargo Journal
9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund

9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund

Photo: BigLift Shipping

Almost a year on after delivering the 6780.5-ton Dogger Bank A HVDC converter station, BigLift Shipping’s DP2 heavy transport vessel BigLift Baffin has delivered the 9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station to Haugesund. Specifically, the module has been delivered to Aibel’s yard where further outfitting will take place. 

Aibel has only recently completed the outfitting of the Dogger Bank A converter station and set it on its foundations at the field. Soon it will be ready to receive power from 95 wind turbines.

Only a few days ago, BigLift Shipping noted that BigLift Baffin is sailing in the Dutch waters, however, the vessel’s AIS position shows it has already reached Aibel’s yard in Haugesund, Norway. Aibel also confirmed the arrival through its social media channels, noting it is the second of three converter platforms that Aibel will deliver to the Dogger Bank wind farm.

9,100-ton Dogger Bank B converter station reaches Haugesund
Photo: Øyvind Sætre / Aibel

Dogger Bank Offshore Wind

Dogger Bank Wind Farm, a joint venture between SSE Renewables, Equinor, and Vårgrønn, is set to be the world’s largest offshore wind farm consisting of 277 wind turbines. The wind farm will be capable of of generating 3.6GW of renewable energy which is enough clean and sustainable electricity to power more than 6 million homes.

Dogger Bank A and B, with a combined generation capacity of 2.4GW, will connect in to the existing Creyke Beck substation near Cottingham in the East Riding of Yorkshire.

The subsea export cables will make landfall to the north of Ulrome, where around 30km of underground cables will take the electricity to converter stations near to Cottingham before passing through the adjacent Creyke Beck substation on to the National Grid.

You just read one of our premium articles free of charge

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Author: Adnan Bajic

Add your comment

characters remaining.

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